Illinois is most popular for its windy city, Chicago, its incredible museums and its Abraham Lincoln Memorial but it is a state which has a lot more to offer.  If you are looking for some haunted local history of the Frank Shaver Allen House in Joliet, then read on.

Ghosts of Frank Shaver Allen House

The Frank Shaver Allen House in Joliet became very popular after a poltergeist activity was reported in the local media. Several sightings have been reported including that of a child, a nanny, and an elderly woman. The family who was residing in the house during that time reported to have heard disembodied voices and witnessed fires in the house which disappeared without any trace of damage.

The ghost of the original owner himself is still supposed to haunt the house until now. However, ghostly activities seemed to have died down in recent years. The elderly woman who is seen in the house is said to have died there of a disease and the little child seen is said to be her ward.

There are other sightings of spirits and other strange events in the house which have been witnessed both by visitors and occupants. Psychics and reporters have also witnessed different ghostly activities. A boy who used to live in the house experienced repeated visits from the ghostly nanny. The ghost nanny and child is said to have invited the living boy to be the ghost boy’s playmate forever. When the house was renovated and redecorated, it triggered a wave of supernatural occurrences.

Brief History

Considered as one of the ten most haunted houses in the state of Illinois, the Frank Shaver Allen House in Joliet was named after its owner, Frank Shaver Allen. He was a talented architect who achieved national recognition from his work. He is most famous for designing a few public school buildings in the Richardsonian Romanesque style; namely, Sheridan Elementary, Joliet Central High, and Broadway.

He also designed the Gothic Revival Christ Episcopal Church in Joliet and Kenosha High School. Both buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.